Kahootz

April 14, 2010

Pedagogies integrating ICT enhances learning and has a potential to transform students learning experiences as it provides tools and environments that support conceptual learning. Kahootz Multimedia 3D Software has a range of features which provide students with numerous exiting ways to explore the digital world. Kahootz programs can be incorporated into teaching includes,  Kahootz soundtracks, new 3D objects and Worlds, special effects, game making actions, integrated movie exporting, animated gifts and more exciting activities, that stimulate and motivate the learners . There are many different ways Kahootz can be integrated which creates new learning environments that effectively transform learning by implementation linked to pedagogy and planning processes.

It is a part of the professional standards for teachers, that all teachers must incorporate ICT in childrens learning experiences. These comply with the different levels of standards and have the basic level, this being level one ‘Design and implement engaging and flexible learning experiences for individuals and groups’. However the Kahootz software is interrelated with level two. ‘Design and implement learning experiences that develop language, literacy and numeracy’ this being as it covers different subjects. (Queensland Government. 2007).as well as this Smart Classrooms Professional Development Framework is a professional learning guide that helps teachers to embrace digital pedagogy. it provides pathways to build teachers professional knowledge, practice, values and relationships in embracing digital pedagogy. Smart Classroom 2010, states ‘…..opportunities for students to use digital resources, technologies and online environments to enhance the learning of concepts and processes’. (Queensland Government. 2010)

 There are many beneficial outcomes when using Kahootz. Firstly students can create new ways to develop stories, games, movies habitats and soundtracks using their imagination, which can be incorporated in any lesson plan for any subject.  The 3D effects on Kahootz help students learn about the natural environment as there are different effects such as rain, snow, water, fire and electricity in a 3D world. This will enhance the use of science, environmental studies and SOSE areas as well as children become more familiar with shapes linked with mathematics.  (Australian children’s television foundation, 2008)

The technology integration planning model (TIP) is a planning approach integration strategy that helps implement teacher’s integration of ICT will be successful. The TIP model gives teachers a general approach to address the challenges involved in integrating technology. (Roblyer, 2006b)        This is reflected back to the use of Multimedia 3D software Kahootz. It is essential to develop lesson plans when incorporating ICT in the classroom to ensure it will be a successful teaching strategy. Roblyers model for implementing ICT integration and transformation is also effective for teachers who are just beginning to use ICT integration in the classroom which will make the process of developing new ways to incorporate technology in the classroom. This model was designed by Roblyer, 2006a and he developed a five phase model with set planning of each level of implementation to get which determine relative advantage, decide on objectives and assessments, design integration strategies, prepare the instructional environment and evaluate and revise integration strategies. (Roblyer, 2006a)

Overall Kahootz is a fantastic program to incorporate in lessons as it is motivational and practical for students as well as complying with the required ICT standards. Understanding Roblyers five stage strategy also makes the process of ICT integration more straightforward for teachers.  

 

Reference list

Australian children’s television foundation, 2008, Kahootz 3 .accessed on 14 April 2010 www.kahootz.com

Queensland Government. (2007). Professional standards for queensland teachers.  Retrieved 14 April 2010 fromwww.qct.edu.au/standards/index.html

 Queensland Government. (2010). Smart Classrooms.Retrieved 14 April 2010 from http://education.qld.gov.au/smartclassrooms/pdframework/  

Roblyer, M. D. (2006a). 4th Edition. Integrating Educational Technology into Teaching. Pearson: New Jersey.

Roblyer, M. D. (2006b). 4th Edition. Integrating Educational Technology into Teaching. Pearson: New Jersey.

Easter Activities

March 31, 2010

The following discussion will be focusing on understanding good practise with ICT by referring back to previous readings with mention of generation cut and paste, technological, pedagogical, content knowledge (TPAK), Smart Classrooms Professional Development Framework (SCPDF) and the Queensland College Teacher standards. In particular it will compare and contrast teachers’ approaches to Easter activities through “An Easter Book Rap” and “Exploring an Easter Website.”

When children are in the classroom they need to be shown how to use, synthesise, process, incorporate and retain information.  (Head, 2008) children’s learning occurs through different sets of concepts that begin with lower order thinking skills (LOTS) which is then developed into higher order thinking skills (HOTS). These levels of order thinking skills are divided into six levels beginning with knowledge at the lowest, then moving ahead to comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. If teachers teach through those processes the children will understand the tasks which are introduced to them, then if children understand it, they will remember and retain it in their long term memory. (Open Education, 2008)  Long term memory can recognise information for an indefinite period. (Robyler, 2006)

According to Bruner (n.d, cited in Robyler, 2006) learning is cognitive growth through interaction with the environment. Children are more likely to understand and remember concepts they discover during their interaction with the environment. Teachers support discovery learning by providing opportunities for exploring and manipulating objects and doing experiments.

The process of the Easter Book Rap helps students learn through the process of experience as students read the book and gain knowledge by practises, symbols and celebrations that reflect their values, belief and sense of belonging. When students read the book they were asked questions, so they reflected back on their experience and teachers can keep up to date with the progress of their students and the knowledge they have retained. As well as this students worked as a group, which develops their social skills and team work. Through the use of storytelling they can reflect on cultural diversity, as the learning is constructivist and the knowledge is in their mind through participation in this experience.

When comparing the Easter Book Rap to the Easter Website; the Easter Website, children are learning through their own process and are more independent. However, this teaching strategy is not always as effective, as children aren’t discussing and developing their knowledge as they are just sitting individually on a computer, observing a website and they are more likely to not retain the information as they aren’t learning through their own application and analysis. When reflecting back to Easter Book Rap, teachers also can keep up to date with the progress of the children by the group discussions, through answering questions and present it through charts, PowerPoint, or a video presentation.

Smart Classrooms Professional Development Framework says to promote students’ reflective learning, critical thinking skills and creativity through the use of digital resources and technologies, which is one of the smart classrooms professional development framework. (Queensland Government, 2007) Standard three of the Queensland College of Teachers also says: Design and implement intellectually challenging learning experiences. Plan and implement learning experiences in which students actively use ICT to access, organise, research, interpret, analyse, create, communicate and represent knowledge, which both relate very closely with these Easter activities.  (Queensland Government, 2007)

TPAK is designed for teachers to incorporate content, pedagogy and knowledge through their framework of teaching (Koehler & Mishra, 2009). An example of integrating both Learning and ICT is at Pallara State School, where Jonathan Clark incorporated science and ICT by using technology, such as, cameras, video cameras, excel spreadsheets, televisions, etc. to observe the possums in their natural habitat. (Clark, 2009)

In conclusion, this discussion has focused on understanding good practise with ICT by particularly comparing and contrasting teachers’ approaches to Easter activities through “An Easter Book Rap” and “Exploring an Easter Website.” and referred it back to the relative readings and concepts.

Reference list

Clark, J. (2009). Utilising the technological affordance of a surveillance system to monitor wildlife: Home secrets of Pallara marsupials. Quick. Journal of the Queensland Society for Information Technology in Education. Spring 2009, 112, 8-16.

Head, B. (2008) Generation cut and Paste. Education Review Technology Guide, September, 2008, p.2-3.

Koehler, M.J., & Mishra, P. (2009). What is technological pedagogical content knowledge? Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 9(1), 60 -70.

Queensland Government. (2007). Professional standards for queensland teachers.  Retrieved 24, March 2010 from www.qct.edu.au/standards/index.html

 Queensland Government. (2010). Smart Classrooms.  Retrieved 24 March 2010 from  http://education.qld.gov.au/smartclassrooms/pdframework/  

Roblyer, M. D. (2006). 4th Edition. Integrating Educational Technology into Teaching. Pearson: New Jersey.

Open education .(2008).Blooms taxonomy:The digital world.Retrieved March 31,2010 fromhttp://www.openeducation.net/2008/04/11/blooms-taxonomy-and-the-digital-world/

Bee Bot

March 24, 2010

The topic that will be discussed is the educational potential of the bee bot. Also included in this essay the following areas will be covered; Smart Classroom, technological pedagogy and content knowledge (TPAK), constructivism and the Professional Standards for Queensland Teachers.

There are two types of teaching styles, objectivism and constructivism. Objectivists and constructivists describe essentially the same things but use different terms.  (Roblyer, 2006)

Objectivism the learning is transmitted knowledge and the teaching method is direct, systematic and structured. And this is viewed that students should all pass the same test and learning is seen to be teacher directed. (Roblyer, 2006)

Humans construct all knowledge in their minds by participating in certain experiences. Constructivism is constructed not transmitted. Students do activities to stimulate their own knowledge through their own experience by doing activities such as literacy games and numeracy games through the use of ICT or group activities. This approach is teacher centred and hands on. (Roblyer, 2006)

The factors which create effective technology integration strategies begins with three different methods. Firstly; the learning theories through the knowledge of the teacher, Secondly; planning model for the procedural and people issues involved in technology integration. This reflects the five-phase planning model and how teachers can use it to plan technology based lessons. Finally; essential conditions which the International Society for Technology and Education (ISTE) emphasises that technology-based strategies work best when optimal conditions are in place to support them.  (Roblyer, 2006)

The Bee Bot is an effective approach in integrating ICT into education. The Bee Bot can be used to stimulate students knowledge in class through their own creation of games which covers numeracy, literacy, music, HPE; students can create their own dance steps and dance along to a song.  It uses cognitive learning theory; through the participation of the students own experience. The Bee Bot helps to promote students’ reflective learning, critical thinking skills and creativity through the use of digital resources and technologies, which is one of the smart classrooms professional development framework. (Queensland Government, 2007)                                                       

The Bee Bot helps students to develop their lower order thinking skills, by the stages of remembering, and building up their knowledge levels to effectively create their own activities to reinforce their understanding.  Standard three: Design and implement intellectually challenging learning experiences. Plan and implement learning experiences in which students actively use ICT to access, organise, research, interpret, analyse, create, communicate and represent knowledge (Queensland Government, 2007)

TPAK is designed for teachers to incorporate content, pedagogy and knowledge through their framework of teaching (Koehler & Mishra, 2009). The Bee Bot incorporates all three components as teachers can create games through their own knowledge and the children can learn from it. It enables the children to create their own games which demonstrate their learning through the use of Technological pedagogy and content knowledge.

In conclusion this discussion has evaluated the educational potential of the Bee Bot in the classroom. It has also covered the relevance of ICT in the classroom, the professional teachers’ standards which relate back to the Bee Bot and how it incorporates all three components of TPAK (technological, pedagogy and content knowledge).

Reference List 

Koehler, M.J., & Mishra, P. (2009). What is technological pedagogical content knowledge? Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 9(1), 60 -70.

Queensland Government. (2007). Professional standards for queensland teachers.  Retrieved 24, March 2010 from www.qct.edu.au/standards/index.html

 Queensland Government. (2010). Smart Classrooms.  Retrieved 24 March 2010 from  http://education.qld.gov.au/smartclassrooms/pdframework/  

Roblyer, M. D. (2006). 4th Edition. Integrating Educational Technology into Teaching. Pearson: New Jersey.

Video Segment

March 17, 2010

The following discussion is focused on the TPAK framework and its knowledge components. It will outline Technology, Pedagogy and Content Knowledge as reflected in the information sheets and in the computer games in classrooms, video. It will also outline how it can help in effective teaching in the classroom and different use of ICT in the classroom.

 

TPAK is designed for teachers to incorporate content, pedagogy and knowledge through their framework of teaching. It integrates what teachers already know (their knowledge) how they teach (their pedagogy) and combine this with technologies to actively interest their students in their learning experience. The development of TPACK by teachers is critical to effective teaching with technology. (Koehler, M. J., & Mishra P. 2009).

 

An example of this is a Year 3 teacher, Neil Webster who had little knowledge about using computer games in classrooms for learning. He experienced this to incorporate it in his teaching from a Year 6 teacher, Dawn Hallybone, who already uses those technologies in her classroom. Hallybone used Nintendo D.S games to play maths, literacy, spelling, algebra, art and reading. She also used computers, by taking advantage of the free learning websites, for example, tut pup (free maths and English game) and speak with other students from around the world.

Not only does the D.S benefit the children educationally but it also improves their group work through communication and discussions about what they have learnt through using the D.S. The Nintendo games also motivates children to demonstrate good behaviour and also serve as a reward. 

The use of computer games in class rooms do not come cheap which is a barrier that the teachers might face when wanting to incorporate D.S games into their teaching. An average price for one Nintendo D.S and a game starts anywhere from $200.

Using the Nintendo D.S and the computers to go on learning websites meets the Queensland Teachers Standard One: Design and implement engaging and flexible learning experiences for individuals and groups, by identifying and use teaching, learning and assessment strategies and resources in which ICT are embedded. (Queensland Government, 2007)

 

As from the Queensland Smart Classrooms website, it says that teachers provide opportunities for students to construct, deepen and demonstrate knowledge using digital resources and technologies in inquiry processes, (Queensland Government, 2010) which is what Dawn Hallybone demonstrates.

In conclusion this discussion has focused on TPAK framework and its knowledge components. It has outlined the benefits of using technology in the classroom through the use of computer games in the classroom and the barriers which affect the use of technology in the classrooms. It has also evaluated the Queensland Teachers standards by elaborating on the required standards by the government.

Reference list

Queensland Government. (2007). Professional standards for queensland teachers.  Retrieved

17 March 2010 from

www.qct.edu.au/standards/index.html

 

Hoehler, M.J., & Mishra, P. (2009). What is technological pedagogical content knowledge? Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 9(1), 60 -70.

 

Queensland Government. (2010). Smart Classrooms.  Retrieved

17 March 2010 from

http://education.qld.gov.au/smartclassrooms/pdframework/

Teachers Tv.(13 Janurary 2010).Computer Games in classrooms.[Video File] Retrieved

17 March, 2010 from

http://www.teachers.tv/video/37337

Dream a better world

March 3, 2010

The following reflection is focusing on and answering the question ‘Does ICT play a role in extending student learning? and should ICT be integral to learning?

ICT has played an extended role in most recent years through the use of technology. An example of this is through the use of smart classrooms, which was developed to embrace the 21st century teaching and learning in school classrooms. (Queensland Government, Smart Classrooms)

Nowadays teachers are required to meet with the demand of ICT in the classrooms such as:

  • Use teaching learning and assessment strategies and resources in which ICT is embedded.
  • Affective teaching and learning and assessment strategies and resources where ICT is embedded.
  • Make ICT integral to learning.

Many states implemented three year plans e.g. ICT for learning strategy (Education Queensland, 2002-4) that predominately focused on IT skills. (Queensland Government, Smart Classrooms)

Technology is particularly important to teach students in early years to give them the knowledge and skills in which they can use throughout their education years. Using technology also gets students more involved in the class environment as they will be more interested in the topics they are studying showing a more interactive approach. An example of this is Jonathan Clark’s article “Utilising the technological affordance of a surveillance system to monitor wildlife: home secrets of pallara marsupials.” This article was produced by a Year 5 teacher who integrated technology through the learning by observing the nesting behaviours of possums and gliders that live in the school through the use of computer based surveillance systems including infa-red cameras.

An example of intergrading learning and technology as students use science process of observation, recording, hypothesising and explaining and students were required to post this in their database on a weekly basis.

All classrooms should have ICT incorporated in the children’s learning as in the twenty –first century the use of technology is an everyday necessity. Technology always motivates students to want to be involved in their learning experience as the use of makes learning appealing to the children. As years go by more new and improved technology is going to be presented to teachers to incorporate in their lesson plans to engage children through the use of ICT.

Some of the barriers that are faced when developing new technologies in classrooms is more of a financial problem as the cost has to be provided or raised by the government or an outside organisation. Referring back to Clarks article access to certain technology was an issue as Telstra Kids funded the cost of $1,200 to establish their project, after two attempts of obtaining the money.

Reference list

Clark, J. (2009). Utilising the technological affordance of a surveillance system to monitor wildlife: Home secrets of Pallara marsupials. Quick. Journal of the Queensland Society for Information Technology in Education. Spring 2009, 112, 8-16.

Queensland government smart classrooms. (2010).Digital Learning Materials.

Retrieved March 10, 2010 from

http://education.qld.gov.au/smartclassrooms/materials.html